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HPV

HPV

Gardasil® Ssuspension for injection in a pre-filled syringe Human Papillomavirus Vaccine [Types 6, 11, 16, 18] (Recombinant, adsorbed)

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you or your child are vaccinated.

– Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.

– If you have any further questions, please ask your doctor or pharmacist.

– If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist. See section 4.

1. What Gardasil is and what it is used ?

Gardasil is a vaccine. Vaccination with Gardasil is intended to protect against diseases caused by Human Papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, and 18.

These diseases include pre-cancerous lesions of the female genitals (cervix, vulva, and vagina); precancerous lesions of the anus and genital warts in males and females; cervical and anal cancers. HPV types 16 and 18 are responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases, 75-80% of anal cancer cases; 70% of HPV-related pre-cancerous lesions of the vulva and vagina, 75% of HPV related pre-cancerous lesions of the anus. HPV types 6 and 11 are responsible for approximately 90% of genital wart cases.

Gardasil is intended to prevent these diseases. The vaccine is not used to treat HPV related diseases. Gardasil does not have any effect in individuals who already have a persistent infection or disease associated with any of the HPV types in the vaccine. However, in individuals who are already infected with one or more of the vaccine HPV types, Gardasil can still protect against diseases associated with the other HPV types in the vaccine.

Gardasil cannot cause the diseases it protects against. Gardasil produces type-specific antibodies and has been shown in clinical trials to prevent HPV 6-, 11-, 16-, and 18-related diseases in women 16-45 years of age and in men 16-26 years of age. The vaccine also produces type-specific antibodies in 9- to 15-year-old children and adolescents. Gardasil should be used in accordance with official guidelines.


2. What you need to know before you receive Gardasil ?

Do not receive Gardasil if:

– you or your child is allergic (hypersensitive) to any of the active substances or any of the other ingredients of Gardasil (listed under “other ingredients”– see section 6). • you or your child developed an allergic reaction after receiving a dose of Gardasil.

– you or your child suffer from an illness with high fever. However, a mild fever or upper respiratory infection (for example cold) itself is not a reason to delay vaccination.

Warnings and precautions

Talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse before vaccination if you or your child

– has a bleeding disorder (a disease that makes you bleed more than normal), for example haemophilia

– has a weakened immune system, for example due to a genetic defect, HIV infection or medicines that affect the immune system.

Fainting, sometimes accompanied by falling, can occur (mostly in adolescents) following any needle injection. Therefore tell the doctor or nurse if you fainted with a previous injection. As with any vaccine, Gardasil may not fully protect 100% of those who get the vaccine.

Gardasil will not protect against every type of Human Papillomavirus. Therefore appropriate precautions against sexually transmitted disease should continue to be used. Gardasil will not protect against other diseases that are not caused by Human Papillomavirus.

Vaccination is not a substitute for routine cervical screening. You should continue to follow your doctor’s advice on cervical smear/Pap tests and preventative and protective measures. What other important information should you or your child know about Gardasil The duration of protection is currently unknown. Longer term follow-up studies are ongoing to determine whether a booster dose is needed.

Other medicines or vaccines and Gardasil

Gardasil can be given with a Hepatitis B vaccine or with a combined booster vaccine containing diphtheria (d) and tetanus (T) with either pertussis [acellular, component] (ap) and/or poliomyelitis [inactivated] (IPV) (dTap, dT-IPV, dTap-IPV vaccines) at a separate injection site (another part of your body, e.g. the other arm or leg) during the same visit.

Gardasil may not have an optimal effect if:

– used with medicines that suppress the immune system. In clinical trials, oral or other contraceptives (e.g. the pill) did not reduce the protection obtained by Gardasil. Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you or your child are taking or have taken recently any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, think you may be pregnant or are planning to have a baby, ask your doctor for advice before taking this medicine. Gardasil may be given to women who are breast-feeding or intend to breast-feed.

Driving and using machines

No studies on the effects on the ability to drive and use machines have been performed.


3. How Gardasil is given ?

Gardasil is given as an injection by your doctor. Gardasil is intended for adolescents and adults from 9 years of age onwards

If you are from 9 to and including 13 years of age

Gardasil can be administered according to a 2-dose schedule: – First injection: at chosen date – Second injection: 6 months after first injection If the second vaccine dose is administered earlier than 6 months after the first dose, a third dose should always be administered. Alternatively, Gardasil can be administered according to a 3-dose schedule: – First injection: at chosen date – Second injection: 2 months after first injection – Third injection: 6 months after first injection The second dose should be administered at least one month after the first dose and the third dose should be administered at least 3 months after the second dose. All three doses should be given within a 1-year period. Please speak to your doctor for more information.

If you are from 14 years of age Gardasil should be administered according to a 3-dose schedule: –

First injection: at chosen date

Second injection: 2 months after first injection

Third injection: 6 months after first injection

The second dose should be administered at least one month after the first dose and the third dose should be administered at least 3 months after the second dose. All three doses should be given within a 1-year period. Please speak to your doctor for more information.

It is recommended that individuals who receive a first dose of Gardasil complete the vaccination course with Gardasil. Gardasil will be given as an injection through the skin into the muscle (preferably the muscle of the upper arm or thigh).

The vaccine should not be mixed in the same syringe with any other vaccines and solutions.

If you forget one dose of Gardasil:

If you miss a scheduled injection, your doctor will decide when to give the missed dose. It is important that you follow the instructions of your doctor or nurse regarding return visits for the follow-up doses. If you forget or are not able to go back to your doctor at the scheduled time, ask your doctor for advice. When Gardasil is given as your first dose, the completion of the vaccination course should be done with Gardasil, and not with another HPV vaccine.

If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist.


4. Possible side effects ?

Like all vaccines and medicines, Gardasil can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them. The following side effects can be seen after the use of Gardasil: Very commonly (more than 1 in 10 patients), side effects found at the injection site include: pain, swelling and redness.

Headache was also seen. Commonly (more than 1 in 100 patients), side effects found at the injection site include: bruising, itching, pain in extremity.

Fever and nausea have also been reported. Rarely (less than 1 in 1000 patients): hives (urticaria).

Very rarely (less than 1 in 10,000 patients),

difficulty breathing (bronchospasm) has been reported.

When Gardasil was given with a combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis [acellular, component] and poliomyelitis [inactivated] booster vaccine during the same visit, there was more headache and injection-site swelling

Side effects that have been reported during marketed use include:

Fainting, sometimes accompanied by shaking or stiffening, has been reported. Although fainting episodes are uncommon, patients should be observed for 15 minutes after they receive HPV vaccine.

Allergic reactions that may include difficulty breathing, wheezing (bronchospasm), hives and rash have been reported.

Some of these reactions have been severe. As with other vaccines, side effects that have been reported during general use include: swollen glands (neck, armpit, or groin); muscle weakness, abnormal sensations, tingling in the arms, legs and upper body, or confusion (Guillain-Barré Syndrome,

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis); dizziness, vomiting, joint pain, aching muscles, unusual tiredness or weakness, chills, generally feeling unwell, bleeding or bruising more easily than normal, and skin infection at the injection site.

Reporting of side effects

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also report side effects directly (see details below). By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

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